Pearl, the Sacred Gem Born in the Blue

A member of the rare Crystal Gem family, a pearl is the natural embodiment of perfection. Born inside the shell of a living mollusk in the deep toughs of oceans, pearls are one of the rarest and most expensive of gems known to this planet.

Pearl Type

Read more about the different types of pearls – Akoya Pearls, Tahitian Black Pearls, South Sea Pearls, Freshwater Pearls, Abalone Pearls, Baroque Pearls, Blister Pearls, Circled Pearls, Coin Pearls, Conch Pearls

Pearl Quality Factors

Pearls are more than just jewels. Rich and adaptable, they can be described as lustrous stars in the world of fine jewelry. A single pearl piece can be fashionable, feminine and fresh. It is able to take a woman through any event in her life, any outfit in her wardrobe. With the correct care, the jewel will remain bright and beautiful for generations to come.

Pearl Education – Everything you need to know about Pearls

Pearls are gemstones which stand out from the rest. Unlike many jewels, they are organic, born from animals rather than the earth’s crust or mantle. They are also uncommon in that they can take months to a few years to form, as opposed to the millions of years stones such as diamonds or sapphires take. Rather than searching for naturally formed pieces, most pearls on the market originate from farms.

Caring for your pearls

Pearls are a particularly delicate gemstone. It is important to take special care of your pearl jewelry to ensure it stays bright and beautiful for generations to come.

Famous Pearls

Jewels of all kinds are special. They depend on special factors in nature to form, creating a mineral or organic piece that gladdens the eye. Human hands also play a part, enhancing a stone’s traits and turning it into a masterpiece. On rare occasions, a person will find a gemstone of rare quality, be it the color, size, shape or convergence of traits thought to be legendary.

Pearl Divers

Collecting saltwater pearls has historically been a tricky task, with the desired mollusks living ten feet, or more often forty feet and deeper below sea level.